I’m on Patreon

As the title says, I’ve created a Patreon account.  Over the years a couple of friends have mentioned doing so and I’ve always sort of dismissed the idea.  It’s not that I don’t understand how Patreon works, or that I don’t think it’s a good idea.  I know several people who have Patreon accounts, and they are wonderful.  I know many people who subsidize their income with Patreon.  What I had a hard time doing was wrapping my head around the idea that I did anything that would be worth people’s support.

It’s a weird sort of personal double-standard that has plagued me all my life.

After how rough last year was, though, I wanted to do something to expand my reach and income.  Especially with the upcoming release of Sew Witchy.  Another one of my friends brought up Patreon again a couple of weeks ago.  He has some experience with it and offered to walk me through everything.  He pointed out that I have knowledge and skills that other people could benefit from.  And this time, I had a list of projects that I had been collecting with the vague idea of doing a sort of add-on or follow up to my book.

With a vague idea and my friend’s encouragement, I set out.  I spent a few days looking at various Patreons.  I checked out those of my friends and people I know.  I looked at ones run by the various ASMR artists I am subscribed to on YouTube.  I searched keywords to see what other people were doing with regards to crafting and sewing and magic.

I also spent a couple of evenings searching out weird vintage sewing ads (which was fun and also horrifying in the various racist ways past advertising was … and still is, to be honest).  I had a hard time figuring out how to balance tiers and goals.  It’s hard for me to say, “Buy my knowledge” rather than “Buy my wares”.  Part of stems from all my self-esteem issues and part of it is because I’m anti-capitalist and feel like I should just give away my knowledge for free.  Honestly, the hardest part of putting this thing together has been struggling with that previous bit.  I am constantly being held back by my fears like that.  I’m working on it.

So, I present here my Patreon.  I’ll be posting a craft each month.  There will be patterns, instructions, video tutorials and more.  I’ll also be posting about my writing, adding excerpts and going into the nitty-gritty of what what goes into making a craft book.  Head on over to the account and sign up.  You can just follow the account, if you wish, or become a supporter.  I’m really excited to see how this goes.

Fabric Magic: 9 Designs from Spoonflower for Love Spells

Love spells have been a staple of magick since the beginning of time. Research any witchcraft or magical tradition in any culture and you’ll find a plethora of spells for gaining love, retaining love, recovering from a broken heart, and wreaking havoc on those who would spurn love.

In most of today’s magical practices it is accepted that working spells against the will of another is verboten.  Some even go so far as to state that such spells won’t work.  Some reference the three-fold rule.  Personally, as someone who has been victim to controlling partners, I’m not a fan of anything that tries to impose the will of one person on another.

That said, there’s a lot of other kinds of love spells one might want to work, and I have highlighted nine different Spoonflower designs below as suitable for your love spell crafty witchery.  You can click on the image to go directly to the page for the design.
Continue reading Fabric Magic: 9 Designs from Spoonflower for Love Spells

Hestia Annointing Oil

Ever since I dedicated myself to Hestia, I’ve discovered that working with a goddess with such a low profile means I have had to create my own practices and rituals.  On the one hand, as a book-learned witch, this is a bit intimidating.  On the other hand, it offers me plenty of opportunities to be creative.

To that end, one of the customs I am working into my daily practice is the use of an anointing oil.  I use it not only for dressing candles, but in consecration of various items: the pots and pans I use, the crock pot, the fridge, the doorjamb of the front door.  The oil provides a conduit between myself and Hestia.  Through that conduit we speak and outline those parts of my home and my life I want in which I want her direct involvement. Continue reading Hestia Annointing Oil

Imbolc Cross Stitch Sampler

Imbolc—the time when we see the fist stirrings of spring—feels far away today, despite coming up in a week’s time.

This morning we woke up to single digit temperatures.  The wind chill was around -20°.  The deep freeze of winter is upon us and the promise of warmer weather has to be taken on faith.

Imbolc Sampler Design

Now is a good time to snuggle on the couch and binge watch shows, or read, or game.  Or, perhaps take a few hours to stitch this Imbolc cross stitch sampler.  It is the first of a series of cross stitch projects I have created to celebrate the Sabbats.  The chart is offered up for free.  It features a Brigid’s Cross, flower bud border, and the word “Imbolc”.  The floss palette is limited to four colors. Continue reading Imbolc Cross Stitch Sampler

Sew Witchy Cover Reveal

When my editor asked me if I had any ideas or suggestions for the cover art for my book, all I wanted was to make sure my name was spelled right.  It’s not that I’m indifferent, but the publisher has a lot more experience about what kind of covers sell what kind of books.  I trusted them to come up with the best cover for the book.  And boy did they deliver.  Just look at this lovely cover:

Sew Witchy Cover Art
Sew Witchy: Tools, Techniques and Projects for Sewing Magick by Raechel Henderson, out December 2019 from Llewellyn.

The book was originally called Sew Craft: a Sewist’s Book of Shadows, but the publisher changed it to Sew Witchy: Tools, Techniques and Projects for Sewing Magick.  And again, I’m cool with the change because if anyone knows what it takes to sell a witchcraft sewing book it would be Llewellyn. Continue reading Sew Witchy Cover Reveal

New Year. New Goddess. New Word.

Despite being a practicing Pagan for years I’ve never formalized my relationship with a deity. I’ve worked with goddesses in the past. Most recently I’ve spent two years honing my magical practice under the tutelage of Hekate. The focus of study was spellwork, protection, connecting with the elemental powers around me, and tapping into my own personal power.

Over the last few months, though, my need for a sword and shield via my relationship with Hekate has lessened. As the question of home and food and work have been settled, I find I want to nurture this new life. And to that point Hekate has stepped back.  In her place another goddess, Hestia, has moved to the forefront of my practice.

Continue reading New Year. New Goddess. New Word.

Fabric Magic: 9 Designs from Spoonflower for Money Spells


There is a special magic in introducing favorites to each other. I got to do that a couple of months ago when I took one of my favorite people, Moira, to one of my favorite places in Chicago, the Textile Discount Outlet. It’s three stores of fabric, trim and notions stuffed into a poorly ventilated, crowded and meandering warehouse. You can find boxes of zippers, bra fasteners, lace scraps, rolls of church brocade, velvet ribbons, toggles, brads, bells and beads. It is a sewist’s fever dream and I love it so very much. Something I found there prompted thoughts of a different kind of magic.

Continue reading Fabric Magic: 9 Designs from Spoonflower for Money Spells

Finding Home

Solstice this year is a low-key affair. We’re still recovering from the upsets and disruptions of 2018. Half of the last few months have been spent realizing all the things we left behind when we moved. For example: the book tree has been built, Santa Hulk and his Little Helper are out, but the lights didn’t make the move. Neither did the stockings, fortunately, my mother sent along two for the kids when she shipped out the annual box of gifts.

Our book tree for this year doubled as a way to store books after we had to leave a lot of our shelves behind.
Our book tree for this year doubled as a way to store books after we had to leave a lot of our shelves behind.
Despite these issues, we’re settling in to the new place. The house is the nicest I’ve ever lived in. My workshop is in a finished basement. We can actually park a car in the garage. In many ways we are better off now than we were a year ago. Every day I am reminded that while change is scary it is also necessary. I clung to the house for so long because I was afraid of what life would be like outside of it. And while some of my predictions did come true, I have found ways to work around them.

We are sharing the house with two friends. It keeps the bills down and ensures there are always people available for D&D sessions.

And I have been working with Hestia over the last few months. Cooking meals for everyone, keeping house, making sure people are taken care of: I find myself playing a role that I hadn’t wanted years ago. Today it feels right. Next year I might feel differently. Who knows?

Honey and Apples
The first things I brought into the house when we moved in were apples and honey from Wyoming.
The goal is to make this house as welcoming and safe as possible. After a year of uncertainty, creating an island of warmth and stability is my focus. The other parts of my life–writing, sewing, etc.–have all fit in around that goal.

My pagan sewing book, Sew Witchy, is due out in August 2019. While I await the final cover art to share, I am working on a fantasy novel, and putting together notes for another pagan book. I worked out a collapsible dice tray, and booked two events for next year. I am working at a pace that is less frantic, less concerned with filling quotas and more focused on how I feel as I work.

So far, it works. Again, change is inevitable and maybe it won’t always work. It feels like the right recipe for making this house a home, though.

Leaning on Your Craft When Life Gets You Down

I’ve been away from posting the last few weeks due to all the things happening at once. Life is starting to settle back down, and I have a backlog of posts to release. I’m not quite ready for that bit of work, though.

One thing I’ve been doing is embracing my witchcraft as a means of dealing with all those changes. Centering myself around my spirituality, my work with Hecate, Hestia and Turtle, and engaging in spellwork aimed at making life run more smoothly has given me a small measure of peace.

And just today I came across this video by Headology and the Witch which goes into how one can make a practice to deal with life changes. I especially like the Tarot spread included towards the end.

For me, small acts, like lighting a candle on my altar to Hestia, give me a moment of peace. I am able to connect with my spiritual, witchy core. It’s a reminder that I am stronger than what is going on around me.

Spell for Overcoming Obstacles

Domestic witchery is a fascination of mine, I think because it seems like it would be the oldest and most common form of witchcraft.  Or maybe it’s just the lazy part of me that appreciates being able to accomplish two tasks in one.

This spell is one I’ve been working with over the last year or so, no only as I write Sew Witchy, but also in my daily life.  When you are facing a great task ahead—a job interview or a court case, say—the odds can feel overwhelming.  Using the spell below and visualization you raise energy to overcome all the small obstacles that can come between you and your goal and also provides you with a magickal talisman attuned to your task.

Materials

  • A wrinkled piece of fabric or clothing*
  • Steam iron
  • Ironing Board

*Circumstances should dictate the fabric you choose.  Clothing that you will be wearing during your challenge is ideal.  For example, a skirt you’ll be wearing to a court case or a shirt you’ll be wearing to an interview.  You could also choose a fabric scrap; about 18″ by 18″ is ideal.

Cotton and linen are best for this spell as they tend to wrinkle naturally.  Synthetics and non-wrinkle clothing is not recommended.

Spellwork

Clear space and cast a circle according to your tradition.  Call on any spirit helpers or deities you wish to aid you in the spell.

Place the wrinkled cloth on the ironing board.  Use a heat setting that is appropriate for the cloth you are using (consult the iron’s operators manual to find out what that is).

As you iron see the wrinkles as the obstacles you face.  See the steam and iron as you press as smoothing out not only the physical wrinkles, but those obstacles.  Visualize the obstacles clearly.  Name them as you work: people’s preconceived notions are smoothed away, distance becomes a non-issue, doors that were closed will now open, even traffic will not be a problem.

Continue working, ironing out all the wrinkles.  See the path you are treading becoming smooth: the road you travel is paved, the ocean you cross is calm, the sky you fly through is clear.  Everything is crisp and pristine, just like the cloth is after you press it.

When you are finished, hang up the clothing, or cloth.  Wear the piece of clothing to the event you are preparing for.  If it is a piece of cloth, hang it near your altar until the event—and your need for it—has passed.

Make your spell more potent by using a linen spray.  Before beginning, make a spray by mixing 1 ounce of witch hazel, 3 ounces of water and ten drops of essential oil together in a spray bottle. Choose an oil aligned to your goal. Spritz a light mist onto the part you are going to press then go over it with an iron.  If using on an article of clothing, test on a small, inconspicuous part first, like an inside hem, to make sure it won’t stain the fabric.