Customer Review: Square Holder

I got a request from my friend and accountant Michael from PRM, Limited to make a holder for his Square reader.  I was already familiar with the device.  I use it myself at conventions.  It didn’t take long to put together and I delivered a prototype for him to test out.

And then I completely forgot about it, until a couple of weeks ago when Michael reminded me about it.  He sent me pictures of the holder and even wrote up a little review.  With the way things have been going lately, I appreciate reading that a little thing I put together has not only served it’s purpose and lasted, but that it has been helpful.

Michael writes:

“About 4 years ago my company started using Square to take credit cards and I asked Raechel at Idiorhythmic Design if she had a key chain type item that held the reader. I knew I was going to be on the go all the time and I wanted something to keep the reader easily accessible and safe. She didn’t but she designed a prototype for me and sent it over. After 4 years of heavy abuse in my pocket, car, and just general life the holder has held up fairly well. Obviously any fabric item is going to break down under that kind of life eventually and as the pictures show the edges have eventually frayed and shown the interior material used to give it strength. The button clasp is still in excellent condition and clasps firmly with no issues. The blue loop for attaching it to my key ring is still super solid and in great shape. The reader has a jack that allows it to plug into the phone and even after 4 years for rubbing against the interior seams they are still in pretty good shape and are only now beginning to show strain from the wear and tear.

“Overall this was a fantastic prototype with 4 years of testing put into it and I can say that if she decides to make them a more permanent item on her store I will be the first to buy a new one. I hope later generations come with fun fabric designs on the outside, but the plain brown used was a also a good choice in a professional setting.”

Thank you, Michael, for putting that thing through the gauntlet and letting me know how it held up.

Book Review: How to Show and Sell Your Crafts by Torie Jaye

As part of my continuing efforts to kick my marketing and selling skills up several notches, I picked up Torie Jaye’s How to Show & Sell Your Crafts from the library.  I will get books from the library first most of the time, and if I find the information in them to be valuable, I’ll buy a copy for my own shelves.  I won’t be picking Jaye’s book up, though.

The book’s focus is on branding: creating your own brand and making sure it saturates every  level of your business.  A good chunk of the book is dedicated to things like picking your  brand’s colors, creating great banner images, choosing an avatar.  This is a book written by a crafter who sees “strong brand focus” as “pivotal to her online success” (as stated in her biography), so the emphasis on branding is understandable.

There’s another section on how to photograph crafts that I found very helpful.  And there are several profiles of other crafters who have made a business of their designs.  The book itself is very pretty.  The layout and design is pleasing, and the pictures are beautifully photographed and presented.  This is the kind of book you want to flip through for inspiration.

However, I came away from the book  feeling that it is a blog’s worth of information stretched over a books’ worth of pages.  While the crafter profiles are nice, the focus was mainly on their bios.  Words of advice or guidance is would be more inspirational than reading about their passion for vintage items.

Included in the book are several crafts.   Ostensibly they were tied into the sections they were found in (paper covered cans as pencil holders in the section on organizing your work space) but they felt like filler meant to pad the page count.

Those sections that I was more interested in—the business of doing business—were sparse.  The page on business plans doesn’t really tell how to write one, or what one looks like.  It doesn’t even tell readers to research more information.  There’s no mention of dealing with taxes, or what it goes into setting up a business.

The book reads like a wish fulfillment manual: emphasis on packaging your crafts and setting up your booth space, talk of when you might need to hire help, blogging and social media.  While these are important things to consider, they’re really ancillary concerns (and in the case of hiring help, concerns that won’t crop up for 99% of the crafters out there) compared to things like finding venues, bookkeeping, taxes and other boring, but necessary details.

If you are looking at trying to make money from your design skills and passions, I’d recommend skipping this book and looking for something more in depth.  If I find one that fits the bill I will definitely mention it here.