Client Spotlight: A.C. & Moira

You all may recall that I’ve mentioned before I don’t take on wedding dress commissions.  It’s not out of a dislike of weddings (I’ve had two of my own: one with the white dress and all the trimmings and one with just me, my love and my daughter at the justice of the peace).  I merely find that there are others who specialize in nuptial-wear and so really no need for my skills.

And yet, I have found myself once again working on a wedding outfit commission, and like the last one, it is not your familiar white satin and lace affair.

Before we get to that commission, however, I have a long awaited (well at least for me) update on the wedding tux I made for A.C. last December.  As a refresher, A.C. is non-binary, and wanted an outfit for their wedding that was a) fitting to their tastes and style b) included some traditional wedding motifs and c) could be worn to other occasions.  I made them a white satin vest suit with lavender lapels.  Well, A.C. just sent me photos of the ceremony featuring their suit and I must say they look absolutely fantastic.  Behold the glory of wearing whatever the frak you want to your wedding:

I’m am thrilled with how the tux turned out and it made my day to get to see the pictures of the happy day.

Now, let’s turn to the next commission, another wedding outfit, for one of my dearest friends.

I’ve known Moira going on eight years.  I met her at the second convention I ever vended at.  She helped spread the word when I ran a fire sale on custom corsets to raise money to keep my house.  We’ve vended together at various events, we bounce ideas off of each other, and we are supportive of each others’ goals as artists, crafters and women.  So when Moira told me that she was getting married to her long-time partner (another wonderful person I am lucky to call my friend), and asked me if I was interested in making her wedding dress I said yes before she had even told me what she wanted.

This weekend Moira came over and we hashed out some of the details.  Before I get into a break down of what I’ll be making for her, I want to make a slight detour and mention that this is the first time I’ve had a client over since we adopted our cats*.  I learned quickly that cats will: lay down on open patterns you are trying to discuss, attack dangling tape measures when you are taking measurements, and monopolize the attention of your client if they give any indication of liking cats.

On to the dress: Moira brought in several patterns she had picked up for us to discuss.  We narrowed it down to the one she and her groom liked best: McCall’s 7086.   McCall Pattern 7086

As with A.C., Moira wants a dress that she could wear after the ceremony to other functions.  I love the idea of practical wedding wear.  (My dress from my first marriage is sitting in a box in my parents’ home.) I took measurements, set up two future appointments for a tissue fitting and a second fitting afterwards.

Then we discussed fabric.  This was honestly the best part of the whole meeting because when Moira asked if I had any advice on patterns.  “Maybe not stripes or plaids because they would be a nightmare to match with this pattern.”  Anything else? Fair game.  As long as she found a print she loved, I’d work with it.  My reasoning is that one should wear what makes one feel fabulous.  If that’s big prints?  Awesome!  And if anyone makes any noises about how the print resembles furniture, then you sit your fabulous self on that person and smother them because you don’t need that kind of negativity in your life.

At this point you might be wondering, “Are you going to add pockets to this dress?”  And that’s how I know you are new to this blog.  Of course I will be adding pockets to this dress.  I personally view any pattern that omits pockets to be a design flaw that should have seen the pattern sent back for redrafting.  But fashion rarely makes sense, which is why I and other sewists are here to make up for the mistakes of others.

I’ll update as work on this dress progresses.  I also have a few other commissions that are in various stages of completion which I’ll post on in the coming months.  In the meantime, I’ve got some pockets to insert.


*I realize I didn’t mention this before, but in January I had to put down Trixie. While I am not ready for another dog, the house was feeling empty without a furry presence, and so at the end of April we adopted two cats: Barley and Jake.  We got them from the Humane Haven in Bolingbrook and the house has felt in balance once again.

Client Spotlight: Matt & Shirley

Tattoos and costuming have a lot in common.  You get your first one and you think you’re done.  Next thing you know the itch for yet another coat, or hat, or patch, or whatever creeps in.  Add LARP into the mix, where you are always on the lookout for a new costume piece for an existing character, or for a brand new character, and every day is a new opportunity for another costume piece.

roach's first larp costume
My first ever LARP costume. I made a T-tunic out of an old linen and lace tablecloth. Not shown, the final product splattered with paint to look like blood.

And like tattoos, if you are lucky you find someone who you can trust to add to your collection.  It can make for a beautiful, and creative, relationship.  As a costumer/seamstress, I love those relationships.  Not only because it means regular income, but because the collaboration can take me to interesting and inventive places.

Matt and Shirley are two such clients.  I met them through LARP, and have been lucky to call them friends over the years.  When the approached me for costumes for a Byzantium based vampire LARP I did a little victory dance.  The last time I worked anywhere near the BCE was back when I first started LARP in a Constantinople by Night game.  There was a lot of room for inventive costuming just waiting to be investigated.

Matt and Shirley are great examples of costuming clients.  They had a good idea of what they wanted and were open to suggestions.  Matt’s costume request was simple: a sarong with a Poseidon themed border print and a cape.  He provided me with pictures of sample garments and knew what colors he wanted.  My only input was to offer up a few designs for him to pick from for the border.

The design was accomplished with fabric paint and a stencil.  I used a linen-look fabric for the sarong and cape for a period-esque look without the drawbacks (wrinkles and a high price point).  For the cloak I added a black and white key trim ribbon and chain clasp.

Stencil This
The most time consuming part of all this was cutting out the stencils. If I were to do this more often I would invest in on of those home laser cutter machines. I feel particularly proud of remembering to put down a garbage bag liner before I started painting.

I had never done stencil work before, so this gave me a valuable opportunity to pick up a new skill, and then think about other ways I could accomplish the same task.  If I had had the time and budget I would have gone with a 100% linen and used a bleach or batik technique for the design.  That said, no matter where you stand on the whole “LARP requires costuming“, (and equivalencies to tattoos aside), I advocate going with what your budget allows.  Getting the look for your character doesn’t have to cost a ton.

Shirley had a vague idea of what she wanted and with some back and forth we settled on a linen chiton with a fur capelet. This led to my favorite moment in the idea process where I mentioned I had a sheepskin in the workshop much to Matt’s disbelief*.

The chiton was, again, made from a linen-look material.  Much like Matt’s sarong and cloak I was just dealing with two long rectangles of cloth.  That was actually the most difficult part of putting the costuming together.  Dealing with yards and yards of cloth can be hard.  I ended up spending a lot of time standing in front of Kenny with fabric draped over my shoulder as I hemmed it.

The capelet was the most difficult piece to put together, mostly due to the fact that I was dealing not with a cut of cloth, but an entire piece that had ragged and awkward edges.  I spent a lot of time with it hung on Mildred, adjusting it this way and that to find the best drape.  The fastenings came from thrifted belts and metal hardware procured from Textile Discount Outlet.

Since neither of these costumes included pockets, and I am a proponent of hands-free gaming, I made up simple drawstring pouches for both out of left over fabric.  At the very least they would be able to store their character sheets out of the way when they weren’t throwing chops.

My other philosophy when it comes to LARP costuming, is that you have a better RP experience when your costuming is comfortable and fits.  I think these two pieces hit both those marks, if I am to judge from the pictures Matt sent me of Shirley in her outfit.

A Fierce and Wise Woman
Shirley in her completed costume. I love how fierce she looks.

*Over the years various and sundry items have materialized in the workshop.  I suspect the house gnomes secret them there.  In this case, however, a friend and client had gifted me the sheepskin after a thrifting trip.

Customer Review: Square Holder

I got a request from my friend and accountant Michael from PRM, Limited to make a holder for his Square reader.  I was already familiar with the device.  I use it myself at conventions.  It didn’t take long to put together and I delivered a prototype for him to test out.

And then I completely forgot about it, until a couple of weeks ago when Michael reminded me about it.  He sent me pictures of the holder and even wrote up a little review.  With the way things have been going lately, I appreciate reading that a little thing I put together has not only served it’s purpose and lasted, but that it has been helpful.

Michael writes:

“About 4 years ago my company started using Square to take credit cards and I asked Raechel at Idiorhythmic Design if she had a key chain type item that held the reader. I knew I was going to be on the go all the time and I wanted something to keep the reader easily accessible and safe. She didn’t but she designed a prototype for me and sent it over. After 4 years of heavy abuse in my pocket, car, and just general life the holder has held up fairly well. Obviously any fabric item is going to break down under that kind of life eventually and as the pictures show the edges have eventually frayed and shown the interior material used to give it strength. The button clasp is still in excellent condition and clasps firmly with no issues. The blue loop for attaching it to my key ring is still super solid and in great shape. The reader has a jack that allows it to plug into the phone and even after 4 years for rubbing against the interior seams they are still in pretty good shape and are only now beginning to show strain from the wear and tear.

“Overall this was a fantastic prototype with 4 years of testing put into it and I can say that if she decides to make them a more permanent item on her store I will be the first to buy a new one. I hope later generations come with fun fabric designs on the outside, but the plain brown used was a also a good choice in a professional setting.”

Thank you, Michael, for putting that thing through the gauntlet and letting me know how it held up.

Client Spotlight: A.C.

As a rule I don’t do wedding attire: either sewing dresses or alterations.  I’ve made an exception in the past because the bride wasn’t looking for your typical wedding gown.  But, there are many sewists that specialize in weddings, and I’d rather leave the bridezilla wrangling to them.  However, when A.C. approached me with a wedding request I immediately agreed.

A.C. is non-binary and wanted to wear a suit for their wedding.  The idea and outfit were too unique to pass up.  I’ve also heard from several trans people about how hard it is to find sewists willing to work with them, which was another reason to say yes to the (non)dress.

We met on a Wednesday for A.C. to hand off the fabric and to discuss the details.  Thanks to the kids being in school I had time to make sure that the house was tidy.  A.C. brought Irish Breakfast Tea and I had my Pandora Celtic station on in the background.  With the exception of Trixie being a brat and insisting she get attention, the meeting was as close to my ideal as possible.  We’d discussed the suit before, so this was more of a chance to make those informal conversations concrete.

McCall's 7952 Vest and Pants Pattern
The pattern in question. Check out how fierce the one in white is.

The pattern A.C. provided is an out of print McCall’s vest and pants pattern.  They decided on a white matte satin material, with a shiny, very light satin for the collar contrast.  A.C. wants to have an outfit that is special for the wedding, but also one they can wear later, to other occasions.  I’m a big fan of this idea.  I did the whole dropping a few hundred on a wedding dress that has sat in storage since the big day, and I regret it.

Despite the “non-traditional” aspect of their wedding ensemble, there was a lot of discussion of the usual nuptial trappings.  One of the things we talked about was making a pocket square from the contrast material for A.C.’s groom to wear.  Before they left, I had measurements, the pattern, and materials; and I had scheduled the work for the month of October.

We also chatted about their work on a Pearl cosplay.

Ultimately, this is what I like: making clothes for people who can’t find what they want off the rack.  The work is never boring, challenging sometimes, but never boring.  I’ll post an update later this month with pictures of the finished outfit.