VikingDad Pro-Tip #28 (Know Your Surroundings)

When you have a rambunctious toddler, like I do, it’s important to make sure they get some socialization and play time in that doesn’t hurt your wallet too much. Know what local restaurants have ‘Kids Eat Free’ days and what’s around them.

For instance, usually every Tuesday is “Kid’s Eat Free” at our local IKEA.  They also have a wonderful thing called Småland.   It’s where you can drop your kids off for an hour and they get to play with other kids.  There are some requirements, but it’s a great way to go if you want to have a “regular” thing your kids get to do.  After the hour is up, we then usually go upstairs to the cafeteria and he gets to have lunch, for free.  Me, I bring my ‘Free Coffee for Life’ mug and enjoy the atmosphere, get some ideas for household stuff and basically get an hour of Dad time.

There are a bunch of restaurants locally that offer the ‘Kids Eat Free’ thing and usually nearby places for them to have fun (like a park, a playplace, children’s museum, etc…) or really anything that you’re into that you want to share with you child.

If you need help, there’s a wonderful website I’ve discovered called Kid’s Meal Deals.  You can search locally but as anything you find on the internet: trust but verify (i.e. call ahead to make sure before you leave the house).

Good luck fellow berserkers… and Happy New Year!

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Viking Dad

Viking Dad

Stephan aka Viking Dad (or Dad the Viking), has lived most of his life in a state of transience, moving from state to state in an effort to gain experience, loot and renown. Now that he’s older (and presumably wiser for all that experience) he’s become quite a bit less transient (having lived in the same place now for over six years). He is married to an awesome pink-haired dual-classed seamstress/shield maiden and is raising two incredibly creative (not to mention unrestrained) children to live a creative lifestyle. This blog is not only an expression of that desire, but a record, an archive for those children and those children’s children to learn about the trials and tribulations of leading such a lifestyle.